Testimonials and Stories

There are many reasons why people love the outdoors and backpacking in the high country, here are a few stories from our participants:

Brian Lance Methow, WA (2018) I thought the hardest part of the trip would be the hiking. But the hardest part was saying goodbye to everyone at the end.

Esther Hammerschlag Methow, WA (2018) We raised money, we raised awareness, and we made new friends. But the most meaningful part was sharing an incredible backpacking experience with my husband-it never would have been possible without the support of Pass to Pass and the llamas.

A.C. Woolnaugh Sandpoint, ID (2017, 2018, 2019) I want to express my deepest appreciation for creating PasstoPass and for including me in the 2017 hike. It pushed me to my limit, but it was an incredible experience that I will never forget. Although at times, it seemed nearly impossible for me to continue, the support hikers and the Parky’s together provided the sense of unity and community necessary for me to take another step. While I doubt I will hike again with PtP, I will treasure this experience forever–and I’m glad I did it!

(2019)Why I Hike PasstoPass

Three years in a row I’ve hiked the PCT with PasstoPass… despite cramps, blisters, bug bites (actually, they were hornet stings), sunburn and other unpleasantness…
Participating also had some pretty serious financial issues—new backpack, new tent, new camp stove, trekking poles and on and on. I hadn’t backpacked in almost 50 years.
So, why did I do it and why do I plan to add 2020 as the 4th year in a row?
As a Libra, I try to stay balanced. So far, I’ve weighted things on the negative side. Here are some of the reasons I keep coming back. First and foremost are the hikers— the PWP’s, the support hikers, the llamas and the through hikers on the trail. We form a community that understands PD and supports each other. We share, we learn and we show the world what we can do. Hiking on the PCT provides unique vistas, an opportunity to challenge oneself and provides all the benefits of participating in outdoor adventures.
Advocacy, education and research are my passion and PasstoPass covers two out of three,
Finally, if you are as lucky as I am, your 20 year old grandson will ask to participate as your support hiker—two years in a row! Talk about a bonding experience and getting to know him as a man instead of a boy.
When all is said and done, the scales are not even close. PasstoPass wins easily. I hope to see y’all next year.
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Bill Meyer- Spokane,  WA (2017, 2018, 2019) In 2015, after having successful DBS (deep brain simulation) surgery, I wanted to get back into backpacking in the high country. So I got together my nephew, Marcus and good friend, Scott and tested my ability to hike with a pack on a 4 day trip in the Enchantments. It proved to be very difficult, particularly the weight of a 40 lb pack with straps over my DBS batteries/generators. The trip was terrific but the pack was definitely a problem. I knew then if I was going to do more backpacking, I would need to carry a maximum 15 lb day pack. With or without DBS, the backpack was too much. I sent a note out through the NW Parkinson’s Foundation to find other Parkies interested in backpacking. Ken Kisch answered my call and we talked. Ken helped with recruitment and made the website, I did recruitment, sponsors and logistics and PasstoPass was born.

After some training hikes and bicycling, I had a back issue that resulted in surgery and my dropping out of the first hike (2016). But now, PasstoPass had taken hold and I became a support person until the following year when we hiked from Rainy Pass through Stehekin to Suiattle River trailhead. That hike we used llamas and we loved them– they were more flexible with our needs, carried goodies like watermelons and were the topic of conversation with everyone we met. We have since refined our planning for shorter mileage each day (about 6 miles each day) and not to exceed 1500-2000′ vertical feet per day.

Hiking in the mountains gets my adrenaline going. I am lucky to live in the Pacific Northwest. Hiking with my Parkie hikers has become my passion. We now have a community of friends including Parkies, support hikers and trail angels that make up PasstoPass.org. As John Muir said:

“And into the forest [or mountains] I go, to lose my mind and find my soul”

Jo Ann Fjellman Seattle, WA (2016) I could not have hiked with a more exceptional group of people. Everyone on the team showed up completely offering 100%.

Patty Driscoll Seattle, WA (2016) Our PD group and support team climbed, swam in lakes, ate huckleberries and worked and played well together. We handled adversity and were stronger for it. Our primary goal of pushing ourselves physically with exercise to help us maintain and improve our strength and endurance to fight PD was realized.

Dave Jarnes Spokane, WA  (2016) I value the experience of  hiking on the PCT  with you and the bonds that were formed so quickly.

Ken Kisch Sammamish, WA (2016, 2017) My favorite experience during the trail was the blueberries that Jo Ann picked for my morning oatmeal.  Good company, good laughs, hard work, great scenery and even the dusty trail, all good. Stehekin was a mystical place of my dreams since childhood which finally became a reality

Frank Hagan Issaquah, WA (2016, 2017) The real rock stars are the “parkies” who dealt with so many issues and still had the energy to help with the llamas as well as camp chores. One couldn’t ask for a better group. Brian‘s involvement was invaluable.

Joe Quinn Portland, OR (2019) Pass-to-pass was an unforgettable experience.  The beauty of the Pacific Crest Trail was incredible, but was surpassed by the beauty of determination, teamwork, compassion, and humor among our hikers.  I came home with a sense of peace and wonder that I hope will linger as long as all the great memories.  I feel privileged and truly blessed to have shared this trip with an amazing group.

 Takahiro Shigemitsu  Bellevue, WA (2019)  The trip had everything – full sun, partial sun, cloudy, rain, thunder storm. And it ended in a sunny day. This resembles emotional and mental roller coaster I often go through. The trip taught me to finish strong on bright side everyday like the trip ended in a sunny day. I have more smiles on my face after the trip.

Laura Kennedy Gould 2019 Magic Trick blog

Brian Lance article Methow News 2018

A.C. Woolnaugh Sandpoint, ID newspaper article 2017

Jo Ann Feldman King 5 Interview 2017

Laura Kennedy Gould “Magic Trick Parkinson’s Blog” 2017

Drawing attention to Parkinson’s Disease on the PCT” by Mark Waters. 2016

From Pass to Pass: Parkinson’s Hikers Complete Nine-Day Adventure” by Seth Manthey. 2016

King5 News Story 2016